Things You Need to Know About Menopause and Depression

menopause and depression

Menopause is natural, but it can cause depression. Women are more likely to experience depressive symptoms during perimenopause and early postmenopause, according to research. Due to hormonal changes and physical and emotional changes during menopause, this risk may increase.

Based on our recent survey on ????Menopause Myths????- What Women Really Think!, approximately 68% of women reported experiencing depression during this transitional phase. This significant finding highlights the prevalence of depression among women going through menopause.

Furthermore, the survey data indicates that women over the age of 50 are particularly susceptible to experiencing depressive symptoms. It also showed that menopause’s emotional challenges require more awareness and support for women.

Depression during menopause goes beyond “feeling blue” or mood swings. It’s a serious mental illness that can affect your life, relationships, and well-being. It’s important to see a doctor if you think you’re depressed during menopause.

When you understand the link between menopause and depression, you can manage your mental health and get the help you need during this difficult time.

Today, I’m going to share what I know about menopause and depression, including causes, symptoms, and treatment tips.

Symptoms of Depression During Menopause

Depression during menopause can show up in different ways, so it’s important to know what to look for. During menopause, some of the most common signs of depression are:

  • Feelings of sadness or emptiness that don’t go away
  • Loss of interest or pleasure in things you once enjoyed
  • Changes in weight or appetite
  • Sleep problems, like not being able to sleep or sleeping too much
  • Tiredness or not enough energy
  • Trouble staying focused, making decisions, or remembering things
  • Feelings of guilt, not being good enough, or being unable to help
  • Irritability or restlessness
  • Physical symptoms, like headaches or stomach problems, with no clear cause
  • Thoughts of death or suicide

If you have any of these symptoms, talk to your doctor. They can help you diagnose depression and choose the right treatment.

READ ALSO: Everything You Should Know About Perimenopause

Causes of Depression in Menopausal Women

menopause and depression

There are several factors that may contribute to the development of depression during menopause. Some of the most common causes include:

Hormonal Changes and Their Impact on Mental Health

Your hormone levels fluctuate during menopause, lowering estrogen and progesterone. 

Many body functions depend on estrogen. Estrogen loss alters brain chemistry and mood-regulating neurotransmitters like serotonin. This can cause mood swings, anxiety, and irritability. Changes in hormones can disrupt the brain’s delicate chemical balance, affecting emotional health.

Menopause can cause trouble sleeping and insomnia. The drop in estrogen could be causing these sleep problems. When you don’t get enough sleep, your mood, irritability, ability to focus, memory, and mental health can all be affected.

During menopause, some women have “menopausal brain fog” or “menopausal memory lapses.” These changes could make it harder to remember things, focus, and do more than one thing at once. These cognitive changes may be caused by hormonal changes, sleep disturbances, and other menopausal symptoms. Most of the time, these changes are mild and don’t last long.

Due to changes in hormones and symptoms, mood disorders may get worse during menopause. During this stage, women may be more prone to depression and anxiety. Physical symptoms, sleep disturbances, and mood and cognition changes can affect a woman’s quality of life. It’s common to feel frustrated, out of control, and unwell.

Women going through menopause should be aware of and deal with the emotional and mental changes that come with this change. Menopause-related mental health issues can be managed with help from doctors, support groups, or counseling.

READ ALSO: How to Lessen the Psychological Effects of Menopause for Over 50

Non-Hormonal Factors Contributing to Depression

In addition to changes in hormones, there are other things that can cause depression during menopause that have nothing to do with hormones. These things could be:

  • A history of depression or anxiety
  • Mental health problems that are caused by genes
  • Stressful life events, such as losing a loved one, getting divorced, or losing a job
  • Chronic pain or health problems
  • Poor sleep due to menopause symptoms, such as hot flashes and night sweats
  • Aging and menopause-related weight gain can make people worry about how they look.

You can take control of your mental health and alleviate symptoms of menopause depression by learning about the various factors that contribute to this condition. 

READ ALSO: How You Can Find Balance During Menopause Over 50

Coping with Menopause-Related Depression

menopause and depression

If you’re depressed during menopause, there are several ways to manage your symptoms and improve your mental health:

  • Stay active: Exercise boosts mood and relieves depression symptoms. To stay motivated, aim for 30 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise most days.
  • Eat a balanced diet: A diet rich in fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean protein, and healthy fats can help you manage menopause.
  • Get enough sleep: Establish a bedtime routine, make your bedroom comfortable, and avoid caffeine and nicotine before bed.
  • Practice relaxation techniques: Deep breathing, meditation, and yoga can reduce stress and promote calm and well-being.
  • Stay connected: Talk to friends, family, or support groups about your feelings and experiences. Menopause can be easier with social support.
  • Seek professional help: If you’re struggling with menopause depression, seek help from a healthcare professional.

Treatment Options for Depression During Menopause

There are several ways to deal with depression during menopause, including:

Psychotherapy

 Psychotherapy, which is also called “talk therapy,” can help you figure out how to deal with depression by helping you explore your feelings and come up with ways to deal with them. Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) and interpersonal therapy (IPT) are two types of psychotherapy that have been shown to be effective at treating depression.

Medication

Antidepressants like selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) can help regulate mood and relieve depression symptoms.

Hormone therapy

Hormone therapy, also known as hormone replacement therapy (HRT) or menopausal hormone therapy (MHT), is a medical treatment that uses hormones to supplement or replace the hormones naturally produced by the body. 

In some cases, a doctor may suggest hormone therapy to help relieve depression caused by changes in hormones during menopause. Hormone therapy can use estrogen alone or estrogen and progesterone together. These hormones can be given in different ways, such as pills, patches, gels, creams, or vaginal preparations.

But hormone therapy has some risks, so it’s important to talk to your doctor about it to see if it’s right for you. Since it’s usually only given for a short time, it needs to be checked on and followed up on regularly. Before choosing hormone therapy, it’s important to get a thorough evaluation and think about other treatments or changes to your lifestyle.

Alternative therapies

Alternative treatments for depression, such as acupuncture, massage, or herbal supplements, may help some women feel better. But you need to talk to your doctor before trying any alternative treatments to make sure they are safe and effective.

Closing Thoughts

Menopause is a normal transition in a woman’s life, but it is not without its emotional toll. Understanding the signs and symptoms of menopause-related depression is crucial. 

The best way to combat the negative effects of menopause on your mental health is to educate yourself on the many factors that contribute to it.

If you’re struggling with depression during menopause, reaching out for emotional support and considering your treatment options can make a world of difference. 

Always keep in mind that I’m rooting for you, and there are several resources to help you get through this.

If you find fabulous50s content useful and would like to support my work, you could always BuyMeATea 🫖 (completely optional, only if you want to!). Your support will help me create more quality videos and content created just for you… Fabulous women over 50! With love and appreciation, thank you. 🙏🏻😘

 

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About Author

Schellea Fowler

Schellea Fowler, the visionary founder of Fabulous50s, brings over three decades of small business leadership and expertise to her legacy. Not only has she excelled personally, but she has also become a mentor, generously sharing her wealth of experience with emerging entrepreneurs. After retiring at 50 in 2016, Schellea’s commitment to continuous growth led her to pursue additional qualifications. A qualified fitness instructor, she is presently continuing her master trainer program, specializing in exercise for older adults. Through Fabulous50s, Schellea remains devoted to her vision of empowering and inspiring women to embrace and celebrate their current stage of life. Schellea Fowler, the visionary founder of Fabulous50s, brings over three decades of small business leadership and expertise to her legacy. Not only has she excelled personally, but she has also become a mentor, generously sharing her wealth of experience with emerging entrepreneurs. After retiring at 50 in 2016, Schellea’s commitment to continuous growth led her to pursue additional qualifications. A qualified fitness instructor, she is presently continuing her master trainer program, specializing in exercise for older adults. Through Fabulous50s, Schellea remains devoted to her vision of empowering and inspiring women to embrace and celebrate their current stage of life. Her additional qualifications include: Neuro Athletics Coaching Certificate (NACC) from Neuro Athletics, Meditation Teacher Training from Yoga Coach, Fashion Styling from the Australian Style Institute, and Advanced Personal Colour Analysis from AOPI.
Above all, Schellea’s mission is simple yet profound: to support women in embracing the aging process with confidence and grace.

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